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 Table of Contents 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 28-30  

Laparoscopic management of tumor in supernumerary ovary


1 Department of Surgery, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad, Haryana, India
2 Department of Gynaecologist and Obstetrician, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad, Haryana, India
3 Department of Radiology, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad, Haryana, India
4 Department of Pathology, Asian Institute of Medical Sciences, Faridabad, Haryana, India

Date of Web Publication22-Mar-2016

Correspondence Address:
Anita Kant
93, Sector 16A, Faridabad - 121 001, Haryana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0976-7800.179172

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   Abstract 

Laparoscopic management of most of the adnexal masses has become feasible in the present era of advancing endoscopic techniques. A postmenopausal lady presented with lump in the abdomen, appeared to be a solid ovarian mass on ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. On laparoscopy, both the ovaries were normal and the mass was not connected to uterus or adnexa. The mass was removed and histopathology confirmed it to be ovarian tissue thus confirming it to be a tumor in a supernumerary ovary. Examples of supernumerary ovary are among the rarest of gynecological abnormalities.

Keywords: Laparoscopic removal, laparoscopy supernumerary ovary, supernumerary ovary


How to cite this article:
Prakash V, Kant A, Parashar A, Rani U. Laparoscopic management of tumor in supernumerary ovary. J Mid-life Health 2016;7:28-30

How to cite this URL:
Prakash V, Kant A, Parashar A, Rani U. Laparoscopic management of tumor in supernumerary ovary. J Mid-life Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 May 12];7:28-30. Available from: https://www.jmidlifehealth.org/text.asp?2016/7/1/28/179172


   Introduction Top


Laparoscopic management of most of the adnexal masses has become feasible in the present era of advancing endoscopic techniques.


   Case Report Top


Mrs S. a 65-year-old lady, postmenopausal since 15 years came with pain in abdomen in Gynecology outpatient department in October 12. On P/A examination, a mass of about 18 weeks size of pregnant uterus was palpable, and on bimanual examination, a 10 cm mass was felt, the uterus was felt to be anteverted, normal in size and the mass was felt in right adnexa and its mobility was restricted. Ultrasound showed that it was a solid ovarian mass. The patient was lost to follow-up and returned in June 2013. Magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and color Doppler of the abdomen were done, and they suggested a solid ovarian tumor with small cystic areas on periphery [Figure 1].
Figure 1: Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvis

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Besides, she had gall stones. All tumor markers (cancer antigen (CA 125), CA 19.9, carcinoembryonic antigen, and alpha fetoprotein) were within normal limits. The patient was taken for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the pelvic view showed a normal size uterus with both ovaries and tubes normal [Figure 2].
Figure 2: Laparoscopic view of pelvis

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A mass (M) was seen beneath the peritoneum on the right side. Cystoscopy was performed (normal) and the right-sided ureter was catheterized. After that the mass was carefully dissected out and removed [Figure 3] and [Figure 4].
Figure 3: Dissection of mass

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Figure 4: Dissection of mass

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Postoperative period was uneventful and the histopathology reported it as ovarian tissue with a small cystadenoma at the periphery [Figure 5].
Figure 5: Histopathology showing ovarian tissue

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   Discussion Top


Examples of supernumerary ovary are among the rarest of gynecological abnormalities. A supernumerary ovary is located at some distance from and not connected to a eutopic ovary; it is an ectopic ovary with no connection with broad ligament, uterus, or infundibulopelvic ligament.[1] This rare anomaly may be located in the pelvis, retroperitoneum para-aortic area, colonic mesentery, or omentum. Aberrant migration of part of the gonadal ridge after incorporation of germ cells leads to this aberration, describes one theory.[2]

In most cases, it is <1 cm in size and usually goes unnoticed at the time of operation or autopsy. This ectopic ovary possesses the functional potential. One-third of these women may have other congenital genitourinary abnormalities.[3]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
   References Top

1.
Wharton LR. Two cases of supernumerary ovary and one of accessory ovary, with an analysis of previously reported cases. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1959;78:1101-19.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Printz JL, Choate JW, Townes PL, Harper RC. The embryology of supernumerary ovaries. Obstet Gynecol 1973;41:246-52.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Clement PB. Nonneoplastic lesions of the ovary. In: Blaustin AU, Kurman RJ, editor. Blaustin's Pathology of the Female Tract; 2002. p. 675.  Back to cited text no. 3
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4], [Figure 5]



 

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