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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 26-31

Robotic-assisted Sacrocolpopexy with versus without Concomitant Midurethral Sling: A 2-year Follow-up of Urinary Symptoms and Quality of Life


1 Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, North Shore University Hospital, Northwell Health System, Great Neck, New York, USA
2 Division of Urogynecology, Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, North Shore University Hospital, Northwell Health System, Great Neck, New York, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jeffrey S Schachar
Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, North Shore University Hospital, Northwell Health System, 300 Community Drive, 4 Levitt, Great Neck, New York 11030
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmh.JMH_64_17

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Objective: The objective of this study was to assess long-term postoperative urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms and quality of life (QOL) in patients after robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy (RASC) with or without concomitant midurethral sling (MUS). Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey of patients comparing long-term postoperative urinary symptoms and QOL measurements in women who underwent RASC with or without MUS. We included all patients from 2011 to 2014 who had RASC with or without MUS. All patients had preoperative urodynamic testing (UDS). Patients who demonstrated stress UI on UDS underwent MUS at the time of RASC. Urinary symptoms and QOL were assessed through the validated Urinary Distress Inventory-6 (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire-7 (IIQ-7) patient questionnaires. Results: Sixty-eight patients met inclusion criteria, 46 patients completed follow-up questionnaires, and were included in the final analysis. Average length of time to follow-up from surgery was 24 months (range: 6–36 months). A statistically significant difference in UDI-6 scores between the two groups (RASC vs. RASC + MUS) was observed. Median (25th and 75th percentiles) scores for UDI-6 were 22.92 (8.33 and 32.29, respectively) for the RASC group and 4.17 (0 and 13.54, respectively) for the RASC + MUS group (P = 0.0017). Median scores for IIQ-7 were 0 (0 and 29.73 for the 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively) for the RASC group and 0 (0 and 0, respectively) for the RASC + MUS group (P = 0.1691). Conclusion: Patients who underwent RASC + MUS scored significantly lower on the UDI-6, indicating fewer urinary distress symptoms. Although not statistically significant, patients in the RASC + MUS group had lower IIQ-7 scores, indicating less negative impact on QOL, compared to the RASC-only group.


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